Leadership Group

The NDSA Leadership Group is comprised of the Coordinating Committee and the Interest Group co-chairs, which in collaboration provide strategic leadership for the organization. Committee members and the committee chair serve staggered terms of three years.

Micah Altman, Chair

Dr. Micah Altman (2nd term, 2013-18) is Director of Research and Head/Scientist, Program on Information Science for the MIT Libraries, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Altman is also a Non-Resident Senior Fellow at The Brookings Institution. Prior to arriving at MIT, Dr. Altman served at Harvard University for fifteen years as the Associate Director of the Harvard-MIT Data Center, Archival Director of the Henry A. Murray Archive, and Senior Research Scientist in the Institute for Quantitative Social Sciences.

Dr. Altman conducts research in social science, information science and research methods -- focusing on the intersections of information, technology, privacy, and politics; and on the dissemination, preservation, reliability and governance of scientific knowledge.

Micah Altman

Aaron Collie

Aaron Collie (Standards & Practices Interest Group co-chair) is the Head of Digital Scholarship and Curation programs at Michigan State University Libraries. He is the Product Owner for the MSU Libraries digital repository and leads a 10 person Scrum team that supports the Libraries free and open source (FOSS) software. He has over a decade of experience working in library and information centers and more than five years of experience leading digital curation operations in an academic research library. Before joining MSU, Aaron worked at the Center for Informatics Research in Science and Scholarship (CIRSS) at the Graduate School for Librarian and Information Science (GSLIS) at the University of Illinois. He received his M.S in Library and Information Science from the University of Illinois in 2010 and was a Graduate Fellow in the Data Curation Education Program. Aaron is an active participant in the NDSA, Code4lib, Citizen Science Association and Mid-Michigan Digital Practitioners communities and currently serves as President of the Michigan Alliance for the Conservation of Cultural Heritage.

Aaron Collie

Bradley Daigle

Bradley Daigle (1st term, 2016-19) is content and strategic expert for the Academic Preservation Trust and other external partnerships at the University of Virginia Library. He also works on copyright issues related to digital collections. Currently he is also Chair of the Virginia Heritage Governance Team. Having been in the library profession for over fifteen years, he has published and presented on a wide range of topics including mass digitization, digital curation and stewardship, sustaining digital scholarship, intellectual property issues, mentoring in libraries, and digital preservation. In addition to his professional field, his research interests also include the history of the book, natural history, and early modern British literature. He received his MA in literature from the University of Montreal and an MLS from Catholic University.

Bradley Daigle

Jim Corridan

Jim Corridan (2nd term, 2012-17) was appointed State Archivist and Director of the Indiana Commission on Public Records in 2005. Concurrently, from 2006 through 2012, he served as Deputy Director of the Indiana State Library for Outreach and Statewide Services. In these capacities he established Indiana’s electronic records program with the archives, Indiana Memory at the State Library, serves as the sponsor of Indiana’s National Digital Newspaper Project and has coordinated statewide efforts to provide workshops on digital preservation and electronic records.

In 2009 Jim was elected to the Board of Directors of the Council of State Archivists (CoSA). He helped establish and chaired CoSA’s State Electronic Records Initiative (SERI) in 2011 and currently serves as President of CoSA. SERI is focused on governance, best practices, awareness and education to strengthen all the state and territorial archives in the United States.

Working with the staff from the Library of Congress, Jim and the Indiana State Archives hosted the first regional Digital Preservation Outreach and Education (DPOE) project, the Midwest train-the-trainer program in partnership with the Library of Congress in August of 2012 and has been an advocate for digital preservation. He was also a founder and serves as a board member of the International Governance Committee of Evergreen, the open source integrated library system.

Jim Corridan

Maureen Harlow

Maureen Harlow (Content Interest Group Co-Chair) is the Digital Librarian at PBS, located in Arlington, Virginia. PBS is comprised of 350 member public television stations that serve all 50 states, Puerto Rico, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and American Samoa. While there, she has been working with tape and file-based workflows, and easing the transition from tape delivery to file deliveries in a broadcast setting. Prior to working at PBS, Maureen was a National Digital Stewardship Resident embedded at the National Library of Medicine. She has also worked at Duke University Archives in the Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library, and the Center for Public Technology at UNC-Chapel Hill. Maureen holds masters degrees in Library Science and Public Administration from UNC-Chapel Hill.

Maureen Harlow

Nick Krabbenhoeft

Nick Krabbenhoeft (Infrastructure Interest Group Co-Chair), is a digital curator interested in the intersection of cultural heritage institutions such as museums, archives, and academia. Currently Head of Digital Preservation at The New York Public Library, he has worked at many levels of the digital preservation lifecycle, conducting research at Educopia, digitizing images and audio at the University of Michigan, writing policy at MATRIX, and auditing software platforms at the Center for Research Libraries. He has also field experience with cultural heritage projects in Turkey, inventoring the historic structures for Alanya and digitizing the slide collection of Josephine Powell. His goal as a data curator is to continue increasing the accessibility of cultural heritage materials.

Nick Krabbenhoeft

Carol Kussmann

Carol Kussmann (1st term, 2016-19) is the Digital Preservation Analyst at the University of Minnesota Libraries. In this role, she works across many departments within the Libraries, as well as outside the Libraries including through the statewide Minnesota Digital Library Program. She addresses current and future requirements for the long-term preservation of electronic records in the areas of archives and special collections, information and data repositories, and journal publishing. As co-chair of the Libraries Electronic Records Task Force her efforts focus on developing and implementing workflows for ingesting, processing, and providing access to incoming electronic materials that are part of the Archives and Special Collections units. As an inaugural Digital Preservation Outreach and Education (DPOE) trainer, she works with Minitex to provide digital preservation training in the region on a regular basis. After completing the initial implementation work for the Council of State Archivists’ (CoSA) Electronic Records Resource Center she remains a member of CoSA’s Tools and Resources Subcommittee. Other current activities include serving on the Steering Committee of the Electronic Records Section of the Society of American Archivists (SAA) and teaching Digital Archives Specialist courses for SAA.

Carol Kussman

Mary Molinaro

Mary Molinaro (1st term, 2016-19) serves as the Chief Operating Officer and Services Manager for the Digital Preservation Network (DPN). Mary previously was a faculty member at the University of Kentucky Libraries and served as director of the Research Data Center in her most recent positon there. Her work and research interests include digital preservation, personal digital archiving, and digital library development. She serves as an anchor instructor and is on the Steering Committee for the Digital Preservation Outreach and Education (DPOE) program at the Library of Congress. Mary also has great interest in supporting library infrastructure and planning in developing nations. She has done extensive work with libraries in Ecuador and served as a Fulbright Senior Specialist in Tunisia.

Mary Molinaro

Bethany Nowviskie

Dr. Bethany Nowviskie is Director of the Digital Library Federation (DLF) at CLIR, the Council on Library and Information Resources, and Research Associate Professor of Digital Humanities in the Department of English at the University of Virginia. Previously, Nowviskie was the director of the Scholars' Lab and Department of Digital Research & Scholarship at the University of Virginia Library and Special Advisor to the UVa Provost, for the advancement of digital humanities research. Recent past roles have included that of Distinguished Presidential Fellow at CLIR, President of the Association for Computers and the Humanities, and chair of both the UVa General Faculty Council and the Modern Language Association's Committee on Information Technology. Recent projects have included Neatline, the Praxis Program and Praxis Network, Speaking in Code, #Alt-Academy, and the Scholarly Communication Institute. Nowviskie was named one of "Ten Tech Innovators" for 2013 by the Chronicle of Higher Education. Her doctorate is in English Language and Literature from the University of Virginia.

Bethany Nowviskie

Gabby Redwine

Gabriela Redwine (1st term, 2016-19) is Digital Archivist at the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Yale, where she focuses on building infrastructure to support the capture, preservation, description, discovery, and access of born-digital archival materials. Before coming to Yale she was Archivist and Metadata/Electronic Records Specialist at the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin. She has written and presented extensively on different aspects of born-digital materials, including most recently Collecting Digital Manuscripts and Archives (Society of American Archivists, 2016) and Personal Digital Archiving Digital Preservation Coalition, 2015.

Gabby Redwine

Robin Ruggaber

Robin Ruggaber (2nd term, 2013-18) is the Chief Technical Officer for the University of Virginia Library. As a founding member of the Fedora, Blacklight, Hydra and Academic Preservation Trust communities, UVa has a long standing commitment to evolving digital stewardship technologies and practices. She serves in a strategic or technical advisory capacity in each of these communities and is responsible for the strategic, architectural and operational aspects of technology for the UVa Library. Ruggaber's career spans spans across industry, federal and state agencies with deepest expertise in directing the design and development of strategies and systems to solve complex problems and meet organization objectives. Ruggaber has worked with UVa for 20 years and before joining the Library in 2011, was the Assistant Director for Infrastructure Division for UVa's core IT organization. She is drawn to work in digital stewardship due to the complex challenges facing the community and the opportunity to protect availability and access to intellectual and cultural knowledge.

Robin Ruggaber

Sibyl Schaefer

Sibyl Schaefer (Infrastructure Interest Group Co-Chair) manages the Chronopolis program and digital preservation initiatives for the University of California, San Diego. She previously served as the Head of Digital Programs for the Rockefeller Archive Center where she worked to fully integrate digital and traditional archival practices, including policy development, forensic and accessioning workflows, and training initiatives to support the long-term stewardship of digitized and born digital materials. Schaefer previously served as the Metadata Librarian for the University of Vermont’s Center for Digital Initiatives and as the User Services Liaison on the Archivists’ Toolkit project out of New York University. She has been recognized an Emerging Leader by the American Library Association and has participated in the Archival Leadership Institute. She is a member of the Society of American Archivists’ Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Committee, and was previously elected to co-chair for the ALA Digital Preservation Interest Group.

Sibyl Schaefer

Helen Tibbo

Dr. Tibbo (2nd term, 2016-19) is an Alumni Distinguished Professor at the School of Information and Library Science (SILS) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH), and teaches in the areas of archives and records management, digital preservation and access, appraisal, and archival reference and outreach. She is also a Fellow of the Society of American Archivists (SAA) and was SAA President 2010-2011. From 2006-2009, Dr. Tibbo was the Principal Investigator (PI) for the IMLS (Institute for Museum and Library Services)-funded DigCCurr I project that developed an International Digital Curation Curriculum for master’s level students. She is also the PI for DigCCurr II (2008-2012) that extends the Digital Curation Curriculum to the doctoral level. In 2009, IMLS awarded Prof. Tibbo two additional projects, Educating Stewards of Public Information in the 21st Century (ESOPI-21) and Closing the Digital Curation Gap (CDCG). ESOPI-21 is a partnership with UNC’s School of Government to provide students with a Master’s of Science in Library/Information Science and a Master’s of Public Administration so that they can work in the public policy arena concerning digital preservation and curation issues and laws. CDCG is a collaboration with the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) and the Digital Curation Center (DCC), both of the United Kingdom, to explore educational and guidance needs of cultural heritage information professionals in the digital curation domain in the US and the UK. Dr. Tibbo is a co-PI with collaborators from the University of Michigan and the University of Toronto on a National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC)-funded project to develop standardized metrics for assessing use and user services for primary sources in government settings. This project extends work that explored user-based evaluation in academic archival settings funded by the Mellon Foundation. Prof. Tibbo is also co-PI on the IMLS-Funded POlicy-Driven Repository Interoperability (PoDRI) project lead by Dr. Richard Marciano and conducted test audits of repositories in Europe and the US with the European Commission-funded ARPARSEN project during the summer of 2011.

Helen Tibbo

Lauren Work

Lauren Work (Content Interest Group Co-Chair) is the Digital Preservation Librarian at the University of Virginia, where she is responsible for the preservation of university digital resources ranging from websites to legacy hard drives. She helps to create workflows and strategies for the sustainable ingest, preservation and access to born-digital content at Virginia via collaboration within communities such as the Academic Preservation Trust, Archivematica, and Fedora. Prior to her arrival at the University of Virginia, Lauren was the Digital Collections Librarian at Virginia Commonwealth University. She has worked at various cultural and academic organizations including NPR, Densho, and both Special Collections and the Media Center at the University of Washington. She was part of the inaugural cohort of the National Digital Stewardship Residency, where she was responsible for creating a digitization and preservation plan for legacy media at the Public Broadcasting Service. She earned her Master of Library and Information Science degree from the University of Washington.

Lauren Work