Leadership Group

Leadership Team

The NDSA Leadership consists of the elected Coordinating Committee, and the chairs/co-chairs of the Interest and Working Groups, and a representative from the Host Organization. Together, the Coordinating Committee and the Interest and Working Group chairs work to articulate a long-term, strategic vision for NDSA. The Leadership group meets once a month online and in person once during the Digital Preservation Annual Conference.

Select activities of the Leadership group include:

  • Approving new NDSA member applications.
  • Creating and reviewing NDSA publications (e.g. The NDSA Agenda).
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of the Interest and Working Groups and providing guidance and assistance to the Group chairs as appropriate. This can include recommending the creation, consolidation, or disbanding of Interest or Working Groups and working to eliminate unnecessary duplication of effort.
  • Coordinating with DLF on administrative management of the NDSA.
  • Working with international partners to extend digital preservation advocacy and awareness
  • Work with parent organization to plan the DigiPres conference
  • Creating and reviewing the annual roadmap for the NDSA

For items that need to be voted on, the Interest and Working group chairs are considered to be ex officio members; they do not vote and their presence is not counted as part of a quorum. Only the elected CC members may vote.

Coordinating Committee

Members may also pursue becoming a member of the Coordinating Committee (CC). The is a three-year elected position that works with the chairs of the Interest and Working groups on the strategic goals of the NDSA. The responsibilities and expectations of individual CC members include:

  • Approving and/or participating in Interest Groups and Working Groups as needed or required.
  • Actively promoting and representing the work of the NDSA in their own professional communities.
  • Actively engaging in the ongoing work of the CC, with an expected 75% attendance record for monthly CC meetings.
  • Communicating clearly, respectfully, and in a timely fashion to support active participation by all members of the project team, especially when leading or participating in CC projects.

The NDSA Leadership Group is comprised of the Coordinating Committee, the Interest Group and Working Group co-chairs, and the Host Organization representatives, which in collaboration provide strategic leadership for the organization. Committee members and the committee chair serve staggered terms of three years.

Host Organization

NDSA derives its administrative and financial support through a “Host Organization”. The Host Organization:

  • Provides a membership mechanism, coordination, and support for the NDSA organization.
  • Provides outreach and communication frameworks to NDSA leadership, which may be used to inform the broader digital preservation community about NDSA activities, events, and products.
  • Represents the NDSA organization with a distinct and branded web presence.
  • Supports the work of the NDSA Coordinating Committee and provides one voting member of the leadership in conjunction with elected members of the CC.
  • Supports and coordinates the execution of an annual NDSA conference.
  • Commits to a 3-year (renewable) term as NDSA host organization.

Coordinating Committee Members

Bradley Daigle, Chair

Bradley Daigle (1st term, 2016-19) is content and strategic expert for the Academic Preservation Trust and other external partnerships at the University of Virginia Library. He also works on copyright issues related to digital collections. Currently he is also Chair of the Virginia Heritage Governance Team. Having been in the library profession for over fifteen years, he has published and presented on a wide range of topics including mass digitization, digital curation and stewardship, sustaining digital scholarship, intellectual property issues, mentoring in libraries, and digital preservation. In addition to his professional field, his research interests also include the history of the book, natural history, and early modern British literature. He received his MA in literature from the University of Montreal and an MLS from Catholic University.

Bradley Daigle

Stephen Abrams

Stephen Abrams (1st term, 2019-21) is head of digital preservation at the Harvard Library, with responsibility for policy, strategy, and innovation regarding long-term stewardship of Harvard’s rich digital collections. He was project leader and editor for the ISO 19005 PDF/A standard, project manager for the JHOVE and JHOVE2 format characterization systems, and principal investigator for the California state government web archive, Cobweb collaborative collection development, and Make Data Count data metric projects. His research interests are in cost and business models for sustainable digital library services, new modes of post-custodial curation, and metrics for evaluating digital preservation efficacy. Mr. Abrams was previously associate director of the UC Curation Center at the California Digital Library. He holds a BA in Mathematics from Boston University, an ALM in the History of Art and Architecture from Harvard University, and is pursuing a PhD in Information Science from Queensland University of Technology.

Stephen Abrams

Karen Cariani

Karen Cariani (1st term, 2017-20) is The David O. Ives Executive Director of the WGBH Media Library and Archives (MLA) and WGBH Project Director for the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB). The MLA provides access to the WGBH archives by providing circulation, accessioning, and preservation activities, in addition to licensing services. Karen has 30 plus years of television production and project management experience. She has been project director for numerous project including: WGBH’s Teachers’ Domain, now PBS Learning Media; WGBH Open Vault, the Boston Local TV News Digital Library project and for development of a digital media preservation system utilizing the Hydra/Samvera technology in partnership with Indiana University. She served two terms (2001-2005) on the Board of Directors of Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA). She was co-chair of the AMIA Local Television Task Force, and Project Director of the guidebook “Local Television: A Guide To Saving Our Heritage,” funded by the NHPRC and co-chair of the AMIA Copyright and AMIA Open Source Committees. She was co-chair of the LOC National Stewardship Digital Alliance for the Infrastructure working group, and served as president of Digital Commonwealth. Recent projects include WGBH Project Director for the American Archive for Public Broadcasting in partnership with the Library of Congress. She is active in the archive community and professional organizations and passionate about the use of media archives and digital library collections for learning and education, but has a particular affinity for science.

Karen Cariani

Salwa Ismail

Salwa Ismail (1st term, 2019-21) is the Head of Library Technologies at Georgetown University Library. Prior to joining Georgetown University, she was the Head of the Digital Library at FAU. Her portfolio includes library servers, systems, and applications; computing infrastructure; web services; digital initiatives and services; digital preservation; digital scholarship; and ILS & discovery services. In 2014, she was listed by E-campus News as “11 leaders shaping the future of higher education”. In 2015, she was named a Library Mover and Shaker by Library Journal for being a digital driver. She is currently the Chair of the DSpace Leadership Group and in 2016-2017 was a mentor to a National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR) program resident, where her project led to Georgetown University Library being selected as an NDSR host institution. She is very passionate about how libraries, through innovation of library technology and digital services, can play a role as agents of research and scholarship in institutions of higher education. She earned her B.S. in Computer Engineering and MBA from Florida Atlantic University and her MSLIS degree from Florida State University. She is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Computational Social Science program at George Mason University.

Salwa Ismail

Carol Kussmann

Carol Kussmann (1st term, 2016-19) is the Digital Preservation Analyst at the University of Minnesota Libraries. In this role, she works across many departments within the Libraries, as well as outside the Libraries including through the statewide Minnesota Digital Library Program. She addresses current and future requirements for the long-term preservation of electronic records in the areas of archives and special collections, information and data repositories, and journal publishing. As co-chair of the Libraries Electronic Records Task Force her efforts focus on developing and implementing workflows for ingesting, processing, and providing access to incoming electronic materials that are part of the Archives and Special Collections units. As an inaugural Digital Preservation Outreach and Education (DPOE) trainer, she works with Minitex to provide digital preservation training in the region on a regular basis. After completing the initial implementation work for the Council of State Archivists’ (CoSA) Electronic Records Resource Center she remains a member of CoSA’s Tools and Resources Subcommittee. Other current activities include serving on the Steering Committee of the Electronic Records Section of the Society of American Archivists (SAA) and teaching Digital Archives Specialist courses for SAA.

Carol Kussman

Sibyl Schaefer

Sibyl Schaefer (1st Term, 2017-20) manages the Chronopolis program and digital preservation initiatives for the University of California, San Diego. She previously served as the Head of Digital Programs for the Rockefeller Archive Center where she worked to fully integrate digital and traditional archival practices, including policy development, forensic and accessioning workflows, and training initiatives to support the long-term stewardship of digitized and born digital materials. Schaefer previously served as the Metadata Librarian for the University of Vermont’s Center for Digital Initiatives and as the User Services Liaison on the Archivists’ Toolkit project out of New York University. She has been recognized an Emerging Leader by the American Library Association and has participated in the Archival Leadership Institute. She is a member of the Society of American Archivists’ Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Committee, and was previously elected to co-chair for the ALA Digital Preservation Interest Group.

Sibyl Schaefer

Linda Tadic

Linda Tadic (1st Term, 2019-21) is founder and CEO of Digital Bedrock, a managed digital preservation service provider that serves any type of organization, and even individuals. She has 30 years’ experience in leading preservation, metadata, and digital production operations at organizations such as ARTstor, HBO, the Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection at the University of Georgia, and the Getty Research Institute. Currently an adjunct professor in UCLA’s Graduate School of Education and Information Studies teaching Digital Asset Management, she was previously an adjunct professor in NYU’s Moving Image Archiving and Preservation program (courses in collection management and cataloging and metadata). She consults and lectures on digital asset management, audiovisual and digital preservation, metadata, and copyright, with clients as diverse as WNET/Thirteen, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, SBS (Australia), Dunhuang Research Academy (China), ESPN, and the Missouri History Museum. She is a founding member and former President of the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA).

Linda Tadic

Helen Tibbo

Dr. Tibbo (2nd term, 2016-19) is an Alumni Distinguished Professor at the School of Information and Library Science (SILS) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH), and teaches in the areas of archives and records management, digital preservation and access, appraisal, and archival reference and outreach. She is also a Fellow of the Society of American Archivists (SAA) and was SAA President 2010-2011. From 2006-2009, Dr. Tibbo was the Principal Investigator (PI) for the IMLS (Institute for Museum and Library Services)-funded DigCCurr I project that developed an International Digital Curation Curriculum for master’s level students. She is also the PI for DigCCurr II (2008-2012) that extends the Digital Curation Curriculum to the doctoral level. In 2009, IMLS awarded Prof. Tibbo two additional projects, Educating Stewards of Public Information in the 21st Century (ESOPI-21) and Closing the Digital Curation Gap (CDCG). ESOPI-21 is a partnership with UNC’s School of Government to provide students with a Master’s of Science in Library/Information Science and a Master’s of Public Administration so that they can work in the public policy arena concerning digital preservation and curation issues and laws. CDCG is a collaboration with the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) and the Digital Curation Center (DCC), both of the United Kingdom, to explore educational and guidance needs of cultural heritage information professionals in the digital curation domain in the US and the UK. Dr. Tibbo is a co-PI with collaborators from the University of Michigan and the University of Toronto on a National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC)-funded project to develop standardized metrics for assessing use and user services for primary sources in government settings. This project extends work that explored user-based evaluation in academic archival settings funded by the Mellon Foundation. Prof. Tibbo is also co-PI on the IMLS-Funded POlicy-Driven Repository Interoperability (PoDRI) project lead by Dr. Richard Marciano and conducted test audits of repositories in Europe and the US with the European Commission-funded ARPARSEN project during the summer of 2011.

Helen Tibbo

Paige Walker

Paige Walker (1st Term, 2019-21) is the Digital Collections & Preservation Librarian at Boston College, where she guides digital preservation and digital archiving activities for born-digital and digitized content. She’s particularly interested in information and network security as they pertain to privacy issues with digital forensics workflows. As an active member of the NDSA and DLF, Paige has participated in the NDSA Web Archiving Survey and the DLF Born-Digital Access working groups, and also co-leads the DLF Technologies of Surveillance Instruction & Outreach subgroup. Paige has a BA from UC Berkeley, an MSLIS from Simmons College, and is working on an MS in cybersecurity from Boston College. She spends her free time volunteering with the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative to combat online hate crime.

Paige Walker

Interest and Working Group Chairs

Laura Alagna

Laura Alagna (Storage Survey Working Group Chair) is the Digital Preservation Librarian at Northwestern University Libraries, where she has developed and implemented policies and workflows for preserving born-digital and digitized content, and serves as the subject matter expert in digital preservation on the Libraries' digital collections application development team. Prior to this, Laura managed the digital archiving program at the Special Collections Research Center of the University of Chicago. She is an active member of the BitCurator Consortium, where she chairs the Program Committee and is on the Executive Council, and is an appointed member of the Illinois State Historical Records Advisory Board. She received her MLIS from the University of Illinois School of Information Sciences.

Laura Alagna

Micah Altman

Dr. Micah Altman (National Agenda Working Group Chair) is Director of Research and Head/Scientist, Program on Information Science for the MIT Libraries, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Altman is also a Non-Resident Senior Fellow at The Brookings Institution. Prior to arriving at MIT, Dr. Altman served at Harvard University for fifteen years as the Associate Director of the Harvard-MIT Data Center, Archival Director of the Henry A. Murray Archive, and Senior Research Scientist in the Institute for Quantitative Social Sciences.

Dr. Altman conducts research in social science, information science and research methods -- focusing on the intersections of information, technology, privacy, and politics; and on the dissemination, preservation, reliability and governance of scientific knowledge.

Micah Altman

Aaron Collie

Aaron Collie (Standards & Practices Interest Group Co-Chair) is the FRASER Digital Library Manager at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis and an Adjunct Lecturer for the School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois. He is a Certified Scrum Master (CSM) and Certified Scrum Product Owner (CSPO) and has over 10 years of experience working on free and open source software (FOSS) development projects. Aaron received his M.S in Library and Information Science from the University of Illinois in 2010 and was a Graduate Fellow in the Data Curation Education Program. In his spare time, Aaron teaches, writes, and consults on topics of data curation and agile workforce development in information-intensive professions.

Aaron Collie

Corey Davis

Corey Davis (Infrastructure Interest Group Co-Chair) is the Digital Preservation Network Coordinator for the Council of Prairie and Pacific University Libraries (COPPUL), where he develops services, infrastructure, and organizational capacity to support long-term preservation. He has been active in academic libraries for 15 years, most recently as Systems Librarian at the University of Victoria, where he oversaw web archiving and digital preservation. He is active in several national preservation efforts in Canada, including as a founding member of the Portage Preservation Expert Group, the Canadian Association of Research Libraries’ Digital Preservation Working Group, and the Canadian Web Archiving Coalition.

Corey Davis

Matt Schultz

Matt Schultz (Content Interest Group Co-Chair) is the Metadata and Digital Curation Librarian for Grand Valley State University Libraries where he is helping to advance preservation and discovery strategies for the university’s unique, distinctive and special digital materials, and advising faculty on data management solutions for their sponsored research. Prior to his work at GVSU, Schultz was the Program Manager for the MetaArchive Cooperative, where he worked closely with members to collaboratively preserve their own unique digital assets. Schultz is co-editor of the first published volume on distributed digital preservation, The Guide to Distributed Digital Preservation (2010, Educopia Institute), and co-author in the 2012 SAA Award-winning Aligning National Approaches to Digital Preservation edited proceedings. He has managed and served as principal investigator on a number of major grant funded projects, including Chronicles in Preservation (NEH, 2011-2014), Lifecycle Management of Electronic Theses and Dissertations (IMLS, 2011-2014), and ETDPlus (2014-2015). Schultz’s current research is investigating the preservation of complex digital objects and the impact on cloud services for public archives. He holds a B.A. in History from GVSU (2007) and a Master of Science in Information (MSI) from the University of Michigan (2009).

Matt Schultz

Nathan Tallman

Nathan Tallman (Infrastructure Interest Group Co-Chair) is Digital Preservation Librarian at Penn State University Libraries where he coordinates policies, workflows and best practices to ensure the long-term preservation and accessibility of PSU Libraries’ born-digital and digitized collections. He is Product Owner for PSU Libraries digital collections repository. He also advises on equipment, infrastructure, and vendors for Penn State digital content. Prior to his arrival at Penn State, Nathan was the Digital Content Strategist at the University of Cincinnati and Associate Archivist at the American Jewish Archives. He is also an active member of Academic Preservation Trust where he chairs the Bagging Best Practices Interest Group.

Nathan Tallman

Lauren Work

Lauren Work (Content Interest Group Co-Chair) is the Digital Preservation Librarian at the University of Virginia, where she is responsible for the preservation of university digital resources ranging from websites to legacy hard drives. She helps to create workflows and strategies for the sustainable ingest, preservation and access to born-digital content at Virginia via collaboration within communities such as the Academic Preservation Trust, Archivematica, and Fedora. Prior to her arrival at the University of Virginia, Lauren was the Digital Collections Librarian at Virginia Commonwealth University. She has worked at various cultural and academic organizations including NPR, Densho, and both Special Collections and the Media Center at the University of Washington. She was part of the inaugural cohort of the National Digital Stewardship Residency, where she was responsible for creating a digitization and preservation plan for legacy media at the Public Broadcasting Service. She earned her Master of Library and Information Science degree from the University of Washington.

Lauren Work

Host Organization

Trevor Owens

Dr. Trevor Owens (Coordinating Committee, DLF representative) is a librarian, researcher, policy maker, and educator working on digital infrastructure for libraries. Owens serves as the first Head of Digital Content Management for Library Services at the Library of Congress. In addition, he teaches graduate seminars in digital history for American University’s History Department and graduate seminars and digital preservation for the University of Maryland’s College of Information, where he is also a Research Affiliate with the Digital Curation Innovation Center. Owens is the author of three books, including The Theory and Craft of Digital Preservation and Designing Online Communities: How Designers, Developers, Community Managers, and Software Structure Discourse and Knowledge Production on the Web. His research and writing has been featured in: Curator: The Museum Journal, Digital Humanities Quarterly, The Journal of Digital Humanities, D-Lib, Simulation & Gaming, Science Communication, New Directions in Folklore, and American Libraries. He serves as a DLF advisory committee member.

Trevor Owens